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Showcase 2016

Showcase of MSc Dissertations

 

Thursday 8th September 2016

Venue: O’Reilly Institute, Trinity College Dublin

Time: 4.00 p.m. to 6 p.m.

 

This event provides an opportunity for business, industry, the public sector and academia to link with graduates who are showcasing their research on five MSc programmes in the School of Computer Science and Statistics: Interactive Entertainment Technology; Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing; Networks and Distributed Systems; Interactive Digital Media, and Health Informatics. It also offers an opportunity for industry to interact with academics and researchers identifying possible future collaborations.


Graduates on these programmes have gained experience with the latest tools and technologies and have been exposed to cutting-edge research being conducted within the School. The nature of the work undertaken equips these graduates with transferable skills relevant to careers in the global technological industry. As part of their MSc studies, students undertake an individual research project leading to a submission of a dissertation of publishable standard.This dissertation reflects an independent piece of exploratory research which significantly contributes to the advancement of technology and involves design, development and evaluation.

If you would like to attend, please register your interest to: events@scss.tcd.ie (There is no charge to attend.)

 

Schedule

4:00p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

  • Opening and outline of MSc programmes and school activities: Prof Lucy Hederman, Director of Postgraduate Teaching and Learning, School of Computer Science and Statistics
  • Dean of Graduate Studies, Trinity College Dublin: Professor Neville Cox
  • Keynote Speaker: Gaia Dempsey, co-founder and vice president of Labs at DAQRI
  • Student "fast-forward" comprising one minute presentations of selected student posters

 

4:45 p.m. - 6 p.m.

  • Poster display, demonstrations and installations at which students, academics and industry interact
     

Keynote Speaker: Gaia Dempsey

 

Gaia Dempsey is the co-founder and vice president of Labs at DAQRI, a global company that specializes in augmented reality and holographic technologies and is the creator of the flagship product, DAQRI Smart Helmet. Gaia led DAQRI’s international expansion and recently opened DAQRI’s first European office in Dublin. 

 

Guide to selected posters, demonstrations and Installations follows:

Please check for further updates closer to the event

Poster Display  (Foyer in O'Reilly Institute)

 


A Multi-tiered Level of Detail System for Game AI

Student:           Patrick O'Halloran    
Supervisor:      Dr Mads Haahr
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)


The goal of this dissertation is to create a Level of Detail (LOD) system that allows for the simulation of large amounts of proactive, persistent NPCs (Non-player Characters). The agents will make decisions based on internal goals, and they will be a persistent presence in the simulation, even when they are off-screen. Current games are often CPU bound and developers have severe limits on how many AI characters can be simulated. Large amounts of AI entities tax the system, and therefore they must be limited either in number or complexity.

The model presented aims to alleviate these computational stresses by simulating characters and events at varying levels of detail. Using Machine Learning, a model is trained that can predict the outcome of events so that they do not have to be simulated fully. Models can be trained for multiple levels of abstraction. This saves a lot of processing and allows more agents to be simulated. The system also aims to attain an accurate model of the full detail simulation in the reduced LOD levels. This should make the simulation feel consistent to the player and increase their immersion and enjoyment.

 

An Approach to Simulate Realistic Cloth

Student:           Navneeth Nagaraj     
Supervisor:      Dr Michael Manzke
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)

Simulation of Cloth in Games and Animation plays a significant role. If the simulation can be taken to a stage where the cloth behaves as real as in the real world then it can be used in many applications. Simulating thin-shell materials like cloth consists of more technical challenges: rendering complex cloth structures, making rendering faster, simulating realistic cloth behavior. This paper includes overcoming the technical challenges, exploring di erent model techniques, analyzing the drawback of the models and making possible corrections which is then integrated to form a new approach. The simulation of the cloth is implemented concentrating on the parameters that affects
the behavior of the cloth. At the end evaluation is done proving that the new approach is promising in giving realistic behavior and can be used in Games and Animation.

 

Cloud Based Control in Building Management Systems

Student:           Conor Mooney     
Supervisor:      Dr Ciarán McGoldrick and Prof Biswajit Basu
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing)

 

Comparative evaluation of Virtualized Environments: Virtual Machines & Containers

Student:           Ranjan Dhar       
Supervisor:      Stefan Weber 
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

Cloud computing is a major component of the IT industry. Current cloud computing solutions make extensive use of virtual machines because they offer a high degree of isolation as well as an opportunity to optimize for effective utilization of available infrastructure. However, virtual machines also rely on a degree of abstraction which may result in performance degradation thereby affect the users or customers. New advancement in container-based virtualization techniques simplifies deployment and offers similar opportunities in the control and optimization of resources. The availability of these two alternative technologies has resulted in a number contrasting opinions and studies. However, the advantages and disadvantages of each technology when compared against its alternative are not clear, which leads to difficulties for infrastructure providers who aim to optimize the use of their resources and the service provided to their customers.

In this study, we explore the performance profile of traditional virtual machine deployments and contrast it with containers. We use a set of workloads that stresses CPU, File I/O and MySQL server to evaluate the performance while scaling up the deployments incrementally. We also evaluate the migration performance of the two on the same network. We use KVM as hypervisor for virtual machines and Docker as container manager. Our results point out that containers perform better in terms of both density and boot latency; however,
the results are reversed in terms of migration performance due to the maturity of migration mechanisms for virtual machines which result in comparatively low service downtime. We also discuss the potential performance inhibiting factors as well as future optimizations.

 

Exploring Efficient Ways of Distributing Code Quality Metricsin Cloud

Student:           Dibangku Baruah   
Supervisor:      Stephen Barrett
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

The objective of this study is to explore ways of efficiently distributing calculation of code quality metrics. A thorough study is made,  to determine whether or not it is possible to distribute calculation of source code complexity metrics and, if possible whether that solution holds against code repositories of all sizes and to explore the best way to distribute out the task to many nodes.

 

Graphics performance analysis of a light field renderer

Student:           Aneesh Roy
Supervisor:      Dr Michael Manzke
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)

 

Highly Parallel Ductile Fracture

Student:           Dan Walsh
Supervisor:      Dr Michael Manzke
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)

Real-time deformantion and fracture have been an open area of research for over two decades, with many various approaches being explored in this time.
Shape matching is a simplified, position-based physics model, originally proposed over ten years ago that has proven viability in soft-body simulation that is also extensible to support fracturing of objects.
In this dissertation, I have taken an existing shape matching algorithm supporting ductile fracture and developed a highly parallel implementation that runs on both CPUs and GPUs and performed a thorough performance analysis to evaluate the solution and guide future work.



Implications for nurses' documentation practices arising from electronic health record (EHR) adoption

Student:           Sinead Impey
Supervisor:      Dr Lucy Hederman
Course:            MSc in Health Informatics

Since the publication of the eHealth Strategy for Ireland and the announcement of a national electronic health record (EHR) strategy, discourse surrounding electronic record adoption has gained momentum in Ireland.


Using a sample of 22 nurses from three healthcare institutes in the Republic of Ireland, the overall objective of this research was to extract the ‘lived experience’ of nurses using electronic records to document patient care; and to discuss potential ways challenges may be mitigated or reduced with regard to a national EHR project. Using a phenomenological approach, the findings show that although nurses were generally positive about EHR use, challenges and workarounds were evident. Challenges discussed surround, “Inadequate number of terminals”, “Interruptions by non-nursing users”, “Location challenges”, “Technical challenges”, “Time constraints on learning” and “Individual traits”. Workarounds identified by participants are “Interim recording”, “Password workarounds”, “Copy and Paste”, “Pre-charting”. Addressing known challenges and workarounds may reduce potential resistance to change and expedite acceptance in a national EHR project.

 

Information Needs within Irish Forensic Mental Health

Student:           Daniel Varghese
Supervisor:      Dr Lucy Hederman
Course:            MSc in Health Informatics

A descriptive qualitative study of information needs within Irish forensic mental health system was conducted using key informants and staff of forensic mental health system. Semi structured interviews were done and data was analysed for theme generation. Major themes that emerged from staff were lack of information, time and illegible handwriting. Key informants identified  customizable electronic health record, integrated alarm system, system for patient finances and patient property and video links as crucial informatio systems within a forensic setting.

 

Influencing Factors in the Quality of Software Development

Student:           Michael Frick       
Supervisor:      Stephen Barrett 
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing)

This dissertation aims to develop an approach to find factors that influence the software development process in either negative or positive ways


Creating Software requires cognitive skills such as logical thinking, creativity or problem solving but also teamwork and good communication. However, the focus of this work lies on the influences in the cognitive performance of the developers. 
Most people notice inconsistency in the quality of their work. There is always a risk that a developer is producing bad code which could lead to bugs and/or delays.


Many developers don’t really know about the exact quality of their code, neither in a general perspective nor in their temporary performance. Even if they do, reasons for negative or positive changes in their code quality may not be obvious. 
Software metrics have been around for decades with the purpose of evaluating the quality and the performance of the programmer but they are used primarily for project management rather than for providing feedback to the developers.


In two experiments, mobile devices are being used to collect the contextual data of the environment and the work patterns of the developers. An installed application on the device of participants gathers information from sensors and collects data which is provided
by the operating system. It accesses the light sensor, the noise level, the step counter, a 3axis-accelerometer and the location of the device. This information is then clustered and linked to a context. 


Two experiments were executed to demonstrate the functionality of developed approach. Overall, the data gathering app generates valuable information about the environment and context. The application leads to findings that give evidence for factors that influence the brain performance for an individual participant and for patterns which could be influences in general. 

 

Mobile Locations Analytics with Wifi Networks

Student:           Damien Kilgannon    
Supervisor:      Dr Ciaran McGoldrick
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing)

 

OF-ICN : OpenFlow based control plane for Information-Centric Networking

Student:           Jeeva Rajendran     
Supervisor:      Stefan Weber
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

OpenFlow is a Software Defined Networking (SDN) approach that is used to separate the data plane and the control plane of a network. This is achieved by defining and separating the network communication into different flows and by controlling the paths of these flows using OpenFlow. The work on the OpenFlow protocol currently focuses and relies on IP-based networking. Information-Centric Networking (ICN) is an alternative Internet architecture which provides network communications based on named contents instead of addresses as in current Internet architecture. However, current ICN approaches lack the definition of a control plane and current OpenFlow specifications do not support the control of ICN flow by default.

This study analyses the potential of OpenFlow in supporting ICN and tries to port ICN functionalities in OpenFlow by modifying and extending OpenFlow components; switch, controller and the protocol. The results from this study reveal that, upon making necessary modifications to the underlying protocol, OpenFlow can successfully support ICN functionalities by making forwarding and caching decisions for ICN flows in the network.

 

Patient Health Monitoring using Body Area Networks

Student:           Mei-Kim Lee
Supervisor:      Dr Ciaran McGoldrick
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing)

In this dissertation project, an entirely wireless and electronic patient health monitoring system is proposed. The project is further motivated as a way to inform medical professionals contextualised sensor data from patients as close to real time as possible and improve patient outcome quality.


The patient health monitoring system proposed in this dissertation takes advantage of the state of art wireless sensing and wireless communication technologies. The system adds a supplementary tier to the typical architecture of a wearable wireless health monitoring system by incorporating a device fixed onto the end-user for the relay of information to a medical professional. In the prototype, four on-body sensors, measuring blood pressure, blood oxygenation, heart rate and movement, form a body area network and communicate via
Bluetooth Low Energy with a near contact unit. Sensed values are stored in a server. Values are retrieved from the server, processed and analysed to produce an appropriate warning which is displayed on an end-device. Warnings are issued by a designed and validated wellness health score algorithm which combines gathered sensor readings.

Overall, it is found that the prototype system successfully enables end-users to be correctly notified of patient health conditions remotely and wirelessly in an acceptable timeframe. Further, the designed approach can be scaled to different medical contexts and environments.

 

Position-Based Viscoelastic fluid simulation

Student:           Yuanqi Huang
Supervisor:      Dr Michael Manzke
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)

Deformable material has become an active area in animation. A huge number of techniques have been explored for achieving a large deformation in a more plausible result. Particle-based representation has its natural advantage for describing reasonable deformation. Specifically, deformable materials are supposed to be treated as continuous flow for more realistic behaviour. Thus research of non-Newtonian fluid has become a popular area as an alternative solution. Most of these approaches are built upon existing fluid simulation. Among all the fluid simulation, Position-Based-Dynamic fluid is a novel method which has a better control over particles but in less complex level. 


This dissertation explored the viability of a new method for viscoelastic fluid building upon PBD fluid model. Two possible approximations (spring and strain tensor) were implemented for viscosity and elasticity behaviours. The full implementation was simulated on GPU platform with visualisation. The results showed that spring model does not fit the PBD, but that strain tensor model works partially. The limitations and reasons were deeply discussed in many aspects. 


Proactive Configuration of Data Centre Networks for Big Data Processing

Student:          Harpreet Singh   
Supervisor:     Dr Stefan Weber
Course:           MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

Various studies have determined that the network is a performance bottleneck in Big Data processing applications running in the cloud such as Hadoop. Numerous attempts have been made to alleviate this network bottleneck by trac engineering during execution of the applications, using Software-De ned Networking. Such measures of trac engineering are overwhelmingly reactive in nature and are bound to induce control trac overhead in the network. In this project, we propose a proactive approach for configuring Data Centre Networks as the means to optimize application trac, speci cally Hadoop; thereby accelerating the execution of applications in the cloud.

We configure the network before execution of the application, to determine if there is a performance gain when there is no control overhead in the network. The network is con gured proactively, by logging the flow decisions made by the reactive algorithms
from previous studies. These flow rules are subsequently installed in the routing devices before the execution of the application, after which, the flows are routed reactively. We demonstrate an average gain in network bandwidth utilization between 11.9% to 59.9%
in comparison to reactive approaches, while Hadoop job completion times are reduced by 10% to 33.5%.

Procedural Generation of Narrative Puzzles

Student:           Barbara De Kegel
Supervisor:      Dr Mads Haahr
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology)

Scalable Vehicular Simulation With Veins  

Student:            Mengdie Kong
Supervisor:       Dr Mélanie Bouroche
Course:             MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing) 

  
Scheduling carers in domiciliary care settings: what are the challenges?

Student:           Mubshir Ali
Supervisor:      Mary Sharp
Course:            MSc in Health Informatics

The purpose of this research was to identify the key factors, and the weightings and constraints associated with those factors, that play a vital role when scheduling the carer in domiciliary care settings. The researcher used a mixture of both qualitative and quantitative research methods for this study. The literature review was performed to identify key factors. To gain an Irish perspective, semi-structured interviews were scheduled with 14 participants from 5 different domiciliary care providers, 2 clients who are receiving the care, and 1 HSE commissioner for Home Care Package (HCP) funding. The outcome was analysed and discussed to establish the final scorecard that was used as a basis for the scoring model. A scoring model decision support system was designed and implemented in a computer program to evaluate the model.

 

Supergraph: Creating the World Graph of Existing Code


Student:          Da Huo      
Supervisor:     Stephen Barrett
Course:           MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

In this dissertation, an approach of creating graph of source code is proposed, where two types of link can be built. Source code is first parsed to code blocks, and each code block can be presented as a token sequence. An algorithm based on Smith Waterman Algorithm is used to compare token sequences to find syntactically similar code blocks. A few methods are used to improved the efficiency of building links. The results show the efficiency is improved by at least ten times.

 

The effect of a prescriber training intervention on the prevalence and types of prescribing errors found in an electronic prescribing system

 

Student:           Fionnuala Nevin
Supervisor:      Gaye Stephens and Dr Tamasine Grimes
Course:            MSc in Health Informatics

Available literature strongly advocates the importance of training for users of electronic prescribing systems to ensure safe and effective use. However, there is a lack of evidence to demonstrate the effect that ongoing training has on the use and impact of electronic prescribing systems. This study investigates the effect of a training intervention on the prevalence of prescribing errors found in an electronic prescribing system. Audit and feedback methods were used for this study. The prevalence of prescribing errors was significantly reduced following the delivery of a classroom-based training intervention. The study supports the need for ongoing training for users of an electronic prescribing system, and the need to provide adequate training resources.

 

Towards Distributing Non-Monotonic Reasoning


Student:           Stephen O'Kennedy
Supervisor:      Stephen Barrett
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Networks and Distributed Systems)

There has been a recent explosion in available data to be processed on the web, social media, sensors, etc. and there is no sign
of that slowing down. All this data is being collected into large data sets. Processing these huge data sets has presented huge challenges
to academia and private industries alike. In an effort to to tackle these challenges there has been significant research into machine
learning techniques to turn these data sets into meaningful information. However, a significant drawback to these techniques
is that they require complete information. Non-monotonic reasoning is a branch of AI (Artificial Intelligence) that tries to reason out
problems based on limited information. Unfortunately, the processes that are carried out by non-monotonic reasoning systems are computationally intensive. This research focuses on identifying potential ways of enabling a non-monotonic system to run concurrently. It will also outline potential model of distribution that may yield a general scalable solution to distributing non-monotonic reasoning.

Towards autonomic uplift of information to RDF


Student:           Anuj Singh
Supervisor:      Dr Declan O'Sullivan
Course:            MSc in Computer Science (Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing)

In this project we propose an approach to transform the XML data into RDF using XQuery. The
mappings from XML to RDF are encoded in XQuery. We are also transforming the XQuery to
RDF, allowing us to analyze, manipulate and recompose mappings automatically. The project is
motivated as a way to provide a robust mechanism to support the maintenance of the
mappings automatically, particularly to cope up with frequent change in data schema or
ontology.


The developed prototype for this research is based on the MarkLogic Server. The prototype
uses an XQuery parser for parsing the XQuery. It provides two ways to analyze and manipulate
the mappings 1) GUI- where the user manually updates the mappings 2) SPARQL- triples of
XQuery can be automatically updated using SPARQL queries. We evaluated the system for both
functionality and usability. We applied the developed solution to the industry problem of
transforming the metadata to RDF. We transformed the Trinity digital collections resource
metadata from FileMaker to modsRDF. For evaluating the system, we changed the mappings
(FileMaker to ModsRDF) automatically as well as manually to see the changes in the final
output. We evaluated the usability with the help of multiple users, who updated and analyzed
the mappings using the prototype. Users rated the prototype based on their experience of
operating it.


Overall, we found that our prototype successfully uplifted both the XML and XQuery. Based on
the evaluation it can be said that the prototype was successful in analyzing, manipulating and
recomposing the mappings automatically.

 

 

Demonstrations and Installations (Large and Small Conference Rooms, O'Reilly Institute)

Course: MSc in Interactive Digital Media

 

EduMon - A Communication and Learning Tool for Children with Learning Disabilities

Students:        Catriona McCarthy, Conor McLaughlin, Susanna Rojero and Aoife Coffey    
Supervisor :    Nina Bresnihan 

The project involves building a multi platform web application that acts as a communication and learning tool for children with intellectual and learning disabilities. The app utilises a firebase database and local storage. Features includes a friendly personalised Monster character that follows the child on their journey, a friendly Irish accent who speaks the individual words and a very large database of words and actions for the child to pick from. Each of the categories also has a fun animation the child can view. The project is also supported by a website that highlights the apps features: www.edumonapp.com 

 

GoTato! App

Students:          Hannah Ryan, Helen Picard, Lucy Estrada, Lulu Wang, Serena Song
Supervisor :      Susan Gill

GoTato! - An app intended to help users get their work done in a realistic, focused way. It is based on the Pomodoro technique, which involves 25 minutes of focused work, then a 5-minute break, and repeating this four times. However, the aim of GoTato! is to make such a structured approach fun; so, for each 25-minute session you complete, you will be rewarded with a virtual potato. Hence the tagline: “Study weird.”


Grow more potatoes, unlock more potato characters: think Platotato, Spudnik, Captain Kirktato, the whole gang. You also have the option of adding your own custom tasks to the app, setting weekly goals, tracking your daily stats, and assigning a unique potato character to each task.


GoTato! - the study app that's as weird as you are!
http://www.gotatoapp.com

 

Perpetuis Futuris: A Virtual Museum of Trinity

            
Students:          Julie Farrell, Cathal McManus, Maria Romanova-Hynes, Anna Sheehan
Supervisor :      Vivienne O'Kelly
"If you were to choose one object that represents your time at Trinity, what would it be?" Trinity College is an institution made up of a collection of buildings and departments, but is in many ways defined by the people who have studied, taught and worked in the university over the centuries. Each member of the college community has a different idea of what Trinity is and what it means to them. Perpetuis Futuris is an online virtual museum exhibit about Trinity which focuses on the memories and experiences individuals have of the institution. Each artefact depicted on the multimedia website is an object chosen by a member of staff, selected to represent their personal connection to the college. 

 

The Me.mo VR Experience

     
Students:          Louis Blanchard, Aisling Holohan, Cait Kane, Pavlina Kubelkova, Carol Taaffe
Supervisor :      Adam Taylor

This project is an experiment in multi-platform storytelling. Me.mo is a fictional corporation which uses its groundbreaking technology to harvest individual memories and re-create them as virtual reality experiences. But there are troubling aspects to Me.mo’s activities. This corporation sells its services with an engaging tagline: ‘memories made brighter’. But there are rumours circulating that Me.mo is using this personal data in illicit ways – possibly for surveillance purposes, and for research conducted without consent.

There are a number of aspects to the Me.mo experience. Visitors to the Me.mo expo (our showcase) will be invited to view six 3D animated virtual reality films. These short films are personal memories re-created by Me.mo’s artists and technicians. However, users who also visit the Me.mo website and social media will gain a different insight into its activities. There is a storm of debate around this company’s ethics. Is it wise to freely share personal data in an age of ‘surveillance capitalism’?

 

TrinityVR

Students:         Ying Feng, Jill Egan, Enda Gallen, Adrian Langtry, Haileen Romain
Supervisor :     Dr Mads Haahr

 

Using cutting-edge virtual reality technology, the TrinityVR mobile app offers users the chance to immerse themselves in the sights, sounds, and stories of Trinity College Dublin. Presented through beautiful 360° photos, videos, and spatialised audio, users are able to navigate and explore the campus at will—including some building interiors that can’t even be visited in person.


Designed with potential visitors to Ireland in mind, the app highlights the school’s rich history, architecture, and community. This content is conveyed through a variety of interactive multimedia, including images, videos, animated 3D renderings, and personal interviews.
The scope of this project reflects the diverse range of technical skills acquired during our time studying this M.Sc in Interactive Digital Media. The project is built using the game developm ent engine Unity, which heavily utilises C# programming. We’ve utilised a variety of
visual techniques including 360 ° photography and videos , post-production video effects, and green-screen. Audio recording and processing create the immersive soundscape, while animated 3D renderings created in Blender allowed us to visually recreate Trinity’s past. An accompanying website designed for the dual purpose of marketing and user support demonstrates our web design, development, and database building skills.

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Ten reasons to study for an MSc at the School of Computer Science and Statistics at Trinity College Dublin

  1. Trinity College Dublin is ranked in the top 100 world universities and recognised internationally as Ireland’s premier university.
  2. Trinity is also recognised as one of the world's leading research-intensive universities which is reflected by the research activity conducted within the School of Computer Science and Statistics (SCSS).
  3. Dublin is at the forefront of this industry with its attractive location both for start-ups and for high growth companies seeking to access the European market.
  4. Nine of the world’s top 10 ICT companies are located in Ireland
  5. Graduates from the SCSS are highly sought after. The School has direct links with key industry players and hosts a Computing Careers event where employers meet students from our postgraduate courses to discuss employment opportunities.
  6. Dissertations from all postgraduate courses are showcased every year to industry and students discuss their research results with industry guests from public sector, business, and industry.
  7. SCSS is host to large-scale national research centres co-funded by Science Foundation Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and industry: ADAPT Centre for Digital Content and Media;  CONNECT, Ireland’s research centre for Future Networks; and the Learnovate Centre.
  8. SCSS is  a partner within additional Irish Research Centres: Centre for Data Analytics (INSIGHT), The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre (LERO).
  9. SCSS is home to a number of TCD Research Centres: Centre for Computing and Language Studies, Centre for Research in IT in Education, Future Cities, Centre for Creative Technologies.
  10. SCSS fosters innovation through its many successful start-up  companies which include Iona Technologies, Havok, Kore, Swrve, Quaternion Labs, LinguaBox, Wifi Guard, CipherApps, Haunted Planet  Studios, Haptica, GLANTA, Tolerant Networks,  Cara Health, X Communications Ltd, EmpowerTheUser, Insight Statistical Consulting, Xcelerit, wripl and Emizar

 

Full-time courses over 1 year starting 2016

MSc in Computer Science

  • Interactive Entertainment Technology
  • Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing
  • Networks and Distributed Systems

MSc in Interactive Digital Media

Part-time courses over 2 years starting 2016

MSc in Management of Information Systems (evenings)

MSc in Health Informatics (evening and weekend)

Postgraduate Certificate in Statistics (evenings)

Further information at: www.scss.tcd.ie/postgraduate/

Structured PhD programme

The School has a large and vibrant group of over 300 researchers, of which more than 150 are PhD students. TheSchool collaborates with leading industry players in the disciplines of Computer Science and Statistics.

PhD students have a wide and varied choice of research areas in one of our main disciplines: computer systems, information systems, intelligent systems, software systems and statistics.

Further information at: www.scss.tcd.ie/postgraduate/structuredphd/

Undergraduate study

Day courses

BA (Mod)/MCS in Computer Science

BA (Mod) in Computer Science and Business

BA (Mod) in Computer Science and Language

BA (Mod) in Management Science and Information Systems Studies

BA, BAI, MAI in Engineering/Electronic and Computer Engineering

 

Further information at: www.scss.tcd.ie/undergraduate/

New in 2017

Full-time over one calendar year

In 2017, the School will launch its new full-time MSc in Computer Science programme offering students options for specializations by choosing from four specific strands. These strands, rotted in the cutting edge of computer science are firmly linked to the core research strengths of the School of Computer Science and Statistics.

Students will apply for and be admitted to one in of the following four strands:

  • Data Science
  • Future Networked Systems
  • Grahphics and Vision Technologies
  • Intelligent Systems

Admissions will open in November 2016

Check for updates at www.scss.tcd.ie/postgraduate/

 

Part-time courses on offer in 2017

MSc in Management of Information Systems (evenings)

Postgraduate Certificate in Statistics (evenings)

The college reserves the right to change and update courses at any time

 

Ten reasons to study at the School of Computer Science and Statistics at Trinity College Dublin

  1. Trinity College Dublin is ranked in the top 100 world universities and recognised internationally as Ireland’s premier university

  2. Trinity is also recognised as one of the world's leading research-intensive universities which is reflected by the research activity conducted within the School of Computer Science and Statistics (SCSS).

  3. Dublin is at the forefront of this industry with its attractive location both for start-ups and for high growth companies seeking to access the European market.

  4. Nine of the world’s top 10 ICT companies are located in Ireland

  5. Graduates from the SCSS are highly sought after. The School has direct links with key industry players and hosts a Computing Careers event where employers meet students from our postgraduate courses to discuss employment opportunities.

  6. Dissertations from all postgraduate courses are showcased every year to industry and students discuss their research results with industry guests from public sector, business, and industry.

  7. SCSS is host to large-scale national research centres co-funded by Science Foundation Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and industry: ADAPT Centre for Digital Content and Media; CONNECT, Ireland’s research centre for Future Networks; and the Learnovate Centre.

  8. SCSS is a partner within additional Irish Research Centres: Centre for Data Analytics (INSIGHT), The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre (LERO).

  9. SCSS is home to a number of TCD Research Centres: Centre for Computing and Language Studies, Centre for Research in IT in Education, Future Cities, Centre for Creative Technologies.

  10. SCSS fosters innovation through its many successful start-up  companies which include Iona Technologies, Havok, Kore, Swrve, Quaternion Labs, LinguaBox, Wifi Guard, CipherApps, Haunted Planet  Studios, Haptica, GLANTA, Tolerant Networks,  Cara Health, X Communications Ltd, EmpowerTheUser, Insight Statistical Consulting, Xcelerit, wripl and Emizar

ww.scss.tcd.ie