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Health Technology Design Group wins best paper award at the ACM CHI Conference2022 May 12

 

 

Health Technology Design Group wins best paper award at the ACM CHI Conference

10 May 2022

SCSS Researchers Camille Nadal, Shane McCully and Dr Gavin Doherty won the best paper award (top 1% of submissions) at the ACM CHI 2022 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems with their paper “The TAC Toolkit: Supporting Design for User Acceptance of Health Technologies from a Macro-Temporal Perspective”.

CHI is the leading international venue for Human-Computer Interaction research, and this is a fantastic achievement for Camille and the team. Their study seeks to facilitate the application of acceptance theory in design practice through the Technology Acceptance (TAC) Toolkit: a novel design tool and method.

User acceptance is key for the successful uptake and use of health technologies but is impacted by numerous factors not always easily accessible nor operationalised by designers in practice. Born out of 30 years of user acceptance theory, the TAC Toolkit supports designers in creating health technologies that people are more likely to accept and use in the long term. Looking at the user journey as a unique evolving trajectory, the TAC Toolkit guides designers to explore a range of factors that influence user acceptance over time. The paper was written in collaboration with Dr Kevin Doherty at the Technical University of Denmark, and Prof Corina Sas at the University of Lancaster.

A further two papers from the HTD group were also accepted for publication by this highly competitive platform. The first study looks at user acceptance of digital COVID-19 certificates, and was conducted in collaboration with researchers Dr Leysan Nurgalieva and Dr Janne Linqvist at Aalto University in Finland, with SCSS researchers Seamus Ryan, Andreas Balaskas and Gavin Doherty. The second study looks at mechanisms for interacting with touchless medical imaging systems, and in particular at ways of avoiding the “Midas touch” problem of unintentional input, in a hospital context. The paper was written in collaboration with Dr Euan Freeman (University of Glasgow), with SCSS researchers Sean Cronin and Gavin Doherty.

 

 

 

References

C. Nadal, S. McCully, K. Doherty, C. Sas, and G. Doherty, The TAC Toolkit: Supporting Design for User Acceptance of Health Technologies from a Macro-Temporal Perspective, Proceedings of CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’22), New Orleans, April 29-May 5, ACM, New York., 2022.

L. Nurgalieva, S. Ryan, A. Balaskas, J. Lindqvist, and G. Doherty, Public views on digital COVID-19 certificates: a mixed methods user study, Proceedings of CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’22), New Orleans, April 29-May 5, ACM, New York., 2022. ​​

S. Cronin, E. Freeman, and G. Doherty, Investigating Clutching Interactions for Touchless Medical Imaging Systems, Proceedings of CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’22), New Orleans, April 29-May 5, ACM, New York., 2022.