The results of the comparison of 10 open-source bibliographic reference parsers

Machine Learning vs. Rules and Out-of-the-Box vs. Retrained: An Evaluation of Open-Source Bibliographic Reference and Citation Parsers

Our paper “Machine Learning vs. Rules and Out-of-the-Box vs. Retrained: An Evaluation of Open-Source Bibliographic Reference and Citation Parsers” got recently accepted and will be presented at Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018. Abstract: Bibliographic reference parsing refers to extracting machine-readable metadata, such as the names of the authors, the Read more…

The workflow of author contributions extraction

Who Did What? Identifying Author Contributions in Biomedical Publications using Naïve Bayes

Our paper “Who Did What? Identifying Author Contributions in Biomedical Publications using Naïve Bayes” got recently accepted and will be presented at Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018. Abstract: Creating scientific publications is a complex process. It is composed of a number of different activities, such as designing the experiments, Read more…

Howto: Import references from webpages (e.g. PubMed, IEEE, ACM, …)

Compared to several other reference managers, Docear lacks a feature to directly import references from the Web. For instance, if you visit the detail page of a research article on a publisher’s website, you might wish to directly import the bibliographic data of that article to Docear. Many publishers offer export options for reference managers such as Endnote, RefWorks, or Zotero. So, how do you do it with Docear?

Fortunately, Docear uses the BibTeX format to store references. BibTeX is a de-facto standard for references that is supported by almost any publisher and any reference manager. So, read on to learn how to import bibliographic data from web-pages in two steps!

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