Academia

What makes a great PhD supervisor (for recommender-systems and machine-learning research)?

From time to time, I get asked by students “how can I find a good PhD supervisor?” And sometimes I sit on PhD evaluation panels and I am surprised how little thought the PhD students put into choosing their supervisor. Therefore, I decided to write this blog post for potential PhD candidates about choosing a good PhD supervisor. I hope it provides guidance to those who plan to do a PhD. In my description, I focus on potential PhD students in information retrieval, machine learning and recommender systems because these are the fields I am working in. However, most of the information probably applies to PhD studies in other fields. Before I explain the important characteristics of a good PhD Read more…

By Joeran Beel, ago
Academia

Various positions to work on research-paper recommender systems (Mr. DLib) and Docear (Bachelor/Master/PhD/Post-Doc)

Update on 2018-03-15: We Are Hiring 1 Software Engineer & 1 Software Architect / Product Owner for a Recommender-System Business Start-up   Updated on 2017-08-14: Here at Docear and Mr. DLib we have many exciting projects in the field of recommender systems, user modelling, personalisation, and adaptive systems (primarily with a focus on digital libraries but we are also open for domains such as health care, transportation, and tourism). If you are interested in pursuing any of the projects as part of a Bachelor, Master, or PhD thesis, as a post-doctoral researcher, or as a short-term research internship, read on. The projects We have a number of interesting projects but please consider the following list only as a suggestion. If you have Read more…

By Joeran Beel, ago
Academia

New Pre-print: The Architecture and Datasets of Docear’s Research Paper Recommender System

Our paper “The Architecture and Datasets of Docear’s Research Paper Recommender System” was accepted at the 3rd International Workshop on Mining Scientific Publications (WOSP 2014), which is held in conjunction with the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL 2014). This means, we will be in London from September 9 until September 13 to present our paper. If you are interested in research paper recommender systems, feel free to read the pre-print. If you find any errors, let us know before August 25 – that’s the date when we have to submit the camera ready version. Here is the abstract: In the past few years, we have developed a research paper recommender system for our reference management software Docear. In Read more…

By Joeran Beel, ago
Academia

Comprehensive Comparison of Reference Managers: Mendeley vs. Zotero vs. Docear

Which one is the best reference management software? That's a question any student or researcher should think about quite carefully, because choosing the best reference manager may save lots of time and increase the quality of your work significantly. So, which reference manager is best? Zotero? Mendeley? Docear? ...? The answer is: "It depends", because different people have different needs. Actually, there is no such thing as the 'best' reference manager but only the reference manager that is best for you (even though some developers seem to believe that their tool is the only truly perfect one). In this Blog-post, we compare Zotero, Mendeley, and Docear and we hope that the comparison helps you to decide which of the reference managers is best for you. Of course, there are many other reference managers. Hopefully, we can include them in the comparison some day, but for now we only have time to compare the three. We really tried to do a fair comparison, based on a list of criteria that we consider important for reference management software. Of course, the criteria are subjectively selected, as are all criteria by all reviewers, and you might not agree with all of them. However, even if you disagree with our evaluation, you might find at least some new and interesting aspects as to evaluate reference management tools. You are very welcome to share your constructive criticism in the comments, as well as links to other reviews. In addition, it should be obvious that we - the developers of Docear - are somewhat biased. However, this comparison is most certainly more objective than those that Mendeley and other reference managers did ;-). Please note that we only compared about 50 high-level features and used a simple rating scheme in the summary table. Of course, a more comprehensive list of features and a more sophisticated rating scheme would have been nice, but this would have been too time consuming. So, consider this review as a rough guideline. If you feel that one of the mentioned features is particularly important to you, install the tools yourself, compare the features, and share your insights in the comments! Most importantly, please let us know when something we wrote is not correct. All reviewed reference tools offer lots of functions, and it might be that we missed one during our review. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="680"] Please note that the developers of all three tools constantly improve their tools and add new features. Therefore, the table might be not perfectly up-to-date. In addition, it's difficult to rate a particular functionality with only one out of three possible ratings (yes; no; partly). Therefore, we highly suggest to read the detailed review, which explains the rationale behind the ratings.[/caption] The  table above provides an overview of how Zotero, Mendeley, and Docear support you in various tasks, how open and free they are, etc. Details on the features and ratings are provided in the following sections. As already mentioned, if you notice a mistake in the evaluation (e.g. missed a key feature), please let us know in the comments.

Overview

[toc] If you don't want to read a lot, just jump to the summary We believe that a reference manager should offer more features than simple reference management. It should support you in (1) finding literature, (2) organizing and annotating literature, (3) drafting your papers, theses, books, assignments, etc., (4) managing your references (of course), and (5) writing your papers, theses, etc. Additionally, many - but not all - students and researchers might be interested in (6) socializing and collaboration, (7) note, task, and general information management, and (8) file management. Finally, we think it is important that a reference manager (9) is available for the major operating systems, (10) has an information management approach you like (tables, social tags, search, ...), and (11) is open, free, and sustainable (see also What makes a bad reference manager).

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By Joeran Beel, ago
Academia

Elsevier (i.e. the owner of Mendeley) “asks” the users of Academia.edu (i.e. a competitor of Mendeley) to take their papers down

A week ago, Elsevier sent messages to some users of Academia.edu, a social network for researchers (Source: Chronicle). Elsevier asked these users to remove some of their papers from their profile page at Academia.edu. Apparently, Elsevier wasn't happy that the authors published papers that Elsevier holds the publishing rights for. It's an interesting discussion whether Elsevier has the right to prohibit uploading papers on Academia's profile page, because authors have the right to publish their articles on their private homepages. Now, authors might argue that their Academia.edu profile is their private homepage. What is even more interesting is the fact that it's Elsevier who did this. That is the same company that recently bought the reference manger Mendeley, which, coincidentally, also offers a social network and hence is a competitor of Academia.edu. I wonder, if Elsevier will soon start to send messages to Mendeley users telling them, too, to not  upload their papers to their profile pages. Or, if Elsevier will just send these messages to users of social networks such as Academia.edu and Researchgate to strenghten their own product Mendeley. Either way, it's not a nice move from Elsevier and confirms the negative attitude that many researchers have against this publisher and it brings back the doubt about Mendeley's openness. Some more detailed discussions on this topic can be found here: (more…)

By Joeran Beel, ago